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Utah Rock Art Research Association
(URARA)

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Upcoming Field Trips and Zoom Presentations

    • 23 Jul 2024
    • 8:00 AM
    • 25 Jul 2024
    • 6:00 PM
    • Riverton, WY
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    Dinwoody FT  July 23-25   Riverton, WY

    Leader: Robert Van Orden


    Greetings Friends!

    This Field Trip will involve 3.5 or more hours of driving every day, so expect long days. The walking at the Archaeological Conservancy site near Legend Rock SP will be short but over slightly steep, rough ground. I know some folks like to drive so they have all their gear with them, but because of limited parking at some sites, we need to carpool as much as possible. So, please have fluids and snacks all packed! At Dinwoody Lake a larger camera might come in handy. This is the WIND River, so bring a jacket, lol. We will strategically stop at every restroom, but there were no restrooms at the Castle Gardens Petroglyphs. We will depart at 8:15 each day, so be ready. We are meeting our guides so we can not wait for late comers.


    Tues July 23 

    Meeting at Wind River Hotel and Casino, Riverton, WY at 8 AM. We will meet in the SW CORNER of the auto parking lot. Carpooling to Ring Lake Ranch. This is ONLY for those who call the Dubois Museum 307-455-2284 and book the Ring Lake Ranch Tour ($75). Please let them know you will be with URARA, they have agreed to take credit card payments individually. Some folks might prefer a cabin at Ring Lake Ranch.

    Afterwards, carpooling to Dinwoody Lake. This is ONLY for those who purchase a Wind River Tribal Fishing License ($40 DAILY). This is a special place. Because of local sentiment, I will need everyone to show me their licenses, so PLEASE have them with you. Licenses available at: RIVERTON, WY- Rocky Mountain Discount Sports, High Country Sporting Goods & 789 Smokeshop; LANDER, WY- Wind River Outdoor Company, Wild Iris, Popo Agie One Stop & Shoshone Rose Casino & Hotel; CROWHEART, WY- Crowheart Store; DUBOIS, WY- Cutthroat Fly Shop & Big Wind River Float Trip & Fly Fishing; SHOSHONI, WY- The Fast Lane; Thermopolis, WY- Mack’s Market, Thermopolis Hardware, White Horse Country Store & Wind River Canyon Whitewater; PINEDALE, WY- The Great Outdoor Shop; ETHETE, WY- Ethete Store; FORT WASHAKIE, WY- Hines General Store & Shoshone and Arapaho Tribal Fish & Game Office. 

    ALSO, online at windriverfishandgame.com, but I had trouble with the website.

    Weds July 24


    Meeting at Wind River Hotel and Casino at 8 AM. Carpooling to NOLS Wyss Campus near Lander, WY for the Red Canyon site. We will sign liability waivers on arrival.

    Followed by a long drive to the beautiful Castle Gardens Petroglyphs where we will enjoy the warm afternoon light. 

    Thurs July 25

    Meeting at Wind River Hotel and Casino at 8 AM. There is no shortage of parking at Legend Rock SP, so carpooling is optional. We may finish earlier on Thurs. We will be signing Risk Acknowledgement Forms to visit the Archaeological Conservancy site nearby, this may be electronically, in advance, TBA. 

    CAMPING is free in the parking lot at Wind River Hotel and Casino. Camping is also free at Lander City Park next to a nice creek. Quality camping and nearby rock art is available at Sinks Canyon SP, and at Ring Lake Campground. I will probably stay at Pilot Butte Reservoir, also nice. Note: RV parks and motels in this area fill up months in advance!

    Some folks might enjoy a more leisurely self exploration of the Trail Lake rock art sites on Monday, some of which are included in the museum tour, that is my plan. I also recommend a sunset at the Bighorn Medicine Wheel a few hours north, there are some special smaller, unfenced medicine wheels close by.

     Feel free to email me for detailsluv4all2634@gmail.com.

    Drive carefully, especially at night, there is plenty of wildlife in this area!!!

    Driving - all 2wd, so we will carpool every day.


    • 08 Aug 2024
    • 5:00 PM
    • 11 Aug 2024
    • 4:00 PM
    • Westwater, Canyon

              URARA SUMMER PICNIC  AUGUST 8-11                                     WESTWATER CANYON, UTAH

                   THREE CANYON RANCH PROPERTY



    Come join us at the a campsite on the ranch property by the Robidoux inscription panel in the corral.  Where Hay and East canyon come together. The Elmgreens have given us permission to camp on their property and visit the sites on their property. There has been plans to improve the road down the canyon to transport crude oil from the Uinta Basin. The plan has the road going through their ranch. We will visit with them about how this would impact them.

    Please arrive Thursday to set up camp, there is no services, so bring everything you need. This is a dry camp with no restrooms. Closest town is Fruita, CO.       (50 m.), if you want to drive back and forth. We'll decide the next two days of sites to visit in the area of the Bookcliff canyons in the area.

    The traditional URARA "potluck" dinner will be Saturday night.  The chili will be provided, along with plates, utensils.  Plan to bring a dish, appetizer, or a dessert as your contribution.   We will contact you once you have registered for the picnic, with your food assignment.

    Plan on a fun weekend with lots of rock art and mingling with each other, sharing stories and all things rock art. 

    ROCK ART THROUGH THE AGES: A MULTI-COMPONENT ROCK ART SITE IN WESTWATER CANYON, GRAND COUNTY, UTAH BY HARRY M. QUINN

    The Westwater Canyon Site contains over twenty-five separate rock art panels within a one mile stretch. These panels exhibit styles ranging from Desert Archaic, Barrier Canyon, Fremont, Ute, and fur traders, to recent graffiti. The rock art found here shows that the area has been in use from before 500 B.0 until the present. The Westwater Canyon Site is in Grand County, Utah on the Dry Canyon, Utah quadrangle. The site is mainly in section 5 of Township 18 South, Range 24 East. A few panels are in the lower part of section 32 of Township 17 South, Range 24 East. The site contains over twenty-five panels, which can be grouped into four major areas (Fig. 1). Two of these areas are along the west wall, one is along the east wall, and one is in the mouth of East Canyon (Fig 1). Portions of this site have been reported by Wormington (1955:82-85), Schaafsma (1970:27), Castleton (1978:173-177), and Schindler (1979:2-5). However, no complete site report has been found for this area nor has one been prepared by the author. The Westwater Canyon Site contains both pictographs and petroglyphs and has rock art styles assignable to the Desert Archaic (7,000 B.C.? to 500 B.C.), Barrier Canyon (500 B.C. to 0), Fremont (A.D. 500 to A.D. 1225), and Ute (A.D. 1500 to A.D. 1900). The dates shown for these different rock art styles have been taken from Smith and Long (1980:105). In addition to the Indian rock art, the site contains two panels done in French. One is dated November 13, 1837 and is related to the early fur trade industry (Schindler 1979; Quinn 1982). The other is not dated and may be of recent origin, rather than being related to the fur traders. The site also contains numerous recent petroglyphic and pictographic graffiti. Each of the rock art styles mentioned above will be discussed individually. Desert Archaic Style There are three panels at this site that appear to belong to the Desert Archaic Style. All three are petroglyphs and all are located in area 3 (Fig. 1). Placement into the Desert Archaic Style is based on comparison to other areas and on their lack of elements assignable to the later Fremont Style, as well as the increased re-patination and higher degree of weathering they show over panels assignable to the Fremont Style. Two of these panels consist of only single concentric circle elements (Fig. 2). Both of these panels are located in protected areas and both are highly weathered and exhibit a strong degree of re-patination in spots. One of these could have some astronomical significance, as it is located back in a narrow opening. 15 ROCK ART THROUGH THE AGES: A MULTI-COMPONENT ROCK ART SITE IN WESTWATER CANYON, GRAND COUNTY, UTAH BY HARRY M. QUINN The Westwater Canyon Site contains over twenty-five separate rock art panels within a one mile stretch. These panels exhibit styles ranging from Desert Archaic, Barrier Canyon, Fremont, Ute, and fur traders, to recent graffiti. The rock art found here shows that the area has been in use from before 500 B.0 until the present. The Westwater Canyon Site is in Grand County, Utah on the Dry Canyon, Utah quadrangle. The site is mainly in section 5 of Township 18 South, Range 24 East. A few panels are in the lower part of section 32 of Township 17 South, Range 24 East. The site contains over twenty-five panels, which can be grouped into four major areas (Fig. 1). Two of these areas are along the west wall, one is along the east wall, and one is in the mouth of East Canyon (Fig 1). Portions of this site have been reported by Wormington (1955:82-85), Schaafsma (1970:27), Castleton (1978:173-177), and Schindler (1979:2-5). However, no complete site report has been found for this area nor has one been prepared by the author. The Westwater Canyon Site contains both pictographs and petroglyphs and has rock art styles assignable to the Desert Archaic (7,000 B.C.? to 500 B.C.), Barrier Canyon (500 B.C. to 0), Fremont (A.D. 500 to A.D. 1225), and Ute (A.D. 1500 to A.D. 1900). The dates shown for these different rock art styles have been taken from Smith and Long (1980:105). In addition to the Indian rock art, the site contains two panels done in French. One is dated November 13, 1837 and is related to the early fur trade industry (Schindler 1979; Quinn 1982). The other is not dated and may be of recent origin, rather than being related to the fur traders. The site also contains numerous recent petroglyphic and pictographic graffiti. Each of the rock art styles mentioned above will be discussed individually. Desert Archaic Style There are three panels at this site that appear to belong to the Desert Archaic Style. All three are petroglyphs and all are located in area 3 (Fig. 1). Placement into the Desert Archaic Style is based on comparison to other areas and on their lack of elements assignable to the later Fremont Style, as well as the increased re-patination and higher degree of weathering they show over panels assignable to the Fremont Style. Two of these panels consist of only single concentric circle elements (Fig. 2). Both of these panels are located in protected areas and both are highly weathered and exhibit a strong degree of re-patination in spots. One of these could have some astronomical significance, as it is located back in a narrow opening. 15 The third panel (Fig. 3) is located out in the open. At least two separate times of usage are indicated, based on the re-patination character of the elements. Both sets of elements appear to represent Desert Archaic Style. This panel contains geomorphic, zoomorphic, and anthropomorphic design elements, including a concentric circle element very similar to the earlier two mentioned panels. Barrier Canyon Style Two panels contain pictographs that exhibit traits of the Barrier Canyon Style. One of these is located in area 1 and the other in area 3 (Fig. 1). Both of these panels are done in a dark, but not vivid, red paint, but are not the same in color. The first panel (Fig. 4) in area 1 (Fig. 1) contains a "bug-eyed" figure with large hands typical of the Barrier Canyon Style (Wormington 1955). This panel is surrounded by Ute Style pictographs, some of which are bichrome. These figures may be younger than the Barrier Canyon Style, but do have some Barrier Canyon characteristics. The second panel (Fig. 5) is located in area 3 (Fig. 1) and consists of five (?) ghost figures, three of which are still in relatively good shape. This panel is located behind and to the right of the large Desert Archaic Style panel. It has been defaced by a "rider on horseback - antlered quadruped hunting scene" petroglyph and by people trying to hammer and/or pry this panel off the wall. This panel exhibits the most vandalism of any panel found at this site. Fremont Style Fremont Style rock art is present here on three panels, all are petroglyphs. One of these is located in area 1, one in area 3, and the other in area 4 (Fig. 1). The panel in area 1 (Fig. 1) is the southern-most petroglyph in the area and consists of a broad shouldered, trapezoidal anthropomorph, a large quadruped, and some dots. It is well up out of the canyon and not visible for any distance. One "typical" Fremont Hunting Scene (Fig. 6) is present at area 4 (Fig. 1). This petroglyph exhibits both antlered and horned quadrupeds, as well as normal and shamanistic anthropomorphs. The anthropomorphs are done in the broad shouldered trapezoidal body shape considered typical of the Fremont Style. Another petroglyph panel (Fig. 7) is located in area 3 (Fig. 1) behind and to the left of the large Desert Archaic Style panel and to the left of the Barrier Canyon Style panel. This panel contains mainly broad-shouldered trapezoidal anthropomorphic elements with some zoomorphic figures. There is a set of pictographic elements that might be of Fremont origin. It consists of four quadrupeds, an anthropomorph holding a staff, and an archshaped design (pen?). Above this are two footprints done in the same shade of red paint. The footprint on the left has seven toes and the one on the right five toes. These are surrounded by elements that I attribute to the Ute Style and which are done in a different color of paint. 16 The third panel (Fig. 3) is located out in the open. At least two separate times of usage are indicated, based on the re-patination character of the elements. Both sets of elements appear to represent Desert Archaic Style. This panel contains geomorphic, zoomorphic, and anthropomorphic design elements, including a concentric circle element very similar to the earlier two mentioned panels. Barrier Canyon Style Two panels contain pictographs that exhibit traits of the Barrier Canyon Style. One of these is located in area 1 and the other in area 3 (Fig. 1). Both of these panels are done in a dark, but not vivid, red paint, but are not the same in color. The first panel (Fig. 4) in area 1 (Fig. 1) contains a "bug-eyed" figure with large hands typical of the Barrier Canyon Style (Wormington 1955). This panel is surrounded by Ute Style pictographs, some of which are bichrome. These figures may be younger than the Barrier Canyon Style, but do have some Barrier Canyon characteristics. The second panel (Fig. 5) is located in area 3 (Fig. 1) and consists of five (?) ghost figures, three of which are still in relatively good shape. This panel is located behind and to the right of the large Desert Archaic Style panel. It has been defaced by a "rider on horseback - antlered quadruped hunting scene" petroglyph and by people trying to hammer and/or pry this panel off the wall. This panel exhibits the most vandalism of any panel found at this site. Fremont Style Fremont Style rock art is present here on three panels, all are petroglyphs. One of these is located in area 1, one in area 3, and the other in area 4 (Fig. 1). The panel in area 1 (Fig. 1) is the southern-most petroglyph in the area and consists of a broad shouldered, trapezoidal anthropomorph, a large quadruped, and some dots. It is well up out of the canyon and not visible for any distance. One "typical" Fremont Hunting Scene (Fig. 6) is present at area 4 (Fig. 1). This petroglyph exhibits both antlered and horned quadrupeds, as well as normal and shamanistic anthropomorphs. The anthropomorphs are done in the broad shouldered trapezoidal body shape considered typical of the Fremont Style. Another petroglyph panel (Fig. 7) is located in area 3 (Fig. 1) behind and to the left of the large Desert Archaic Style panel and to the left of the Barrier Canyon Style panel. This panel contains mainly broad-shouldered trapezoidal anthropomorphic elements with some zoomorphic figures. There is a set of pictographic elements that might be of Fremont origin. It consists of four quadrupeds, an anthropomorph holding a staff, and an archshaped design (pen?). Above this are two footprints done in the same shade of red paint. The footprint on the left has seven toes and the one on the right five toes. These are surrounded by elements that I attribute to the Ute Style and which are done in a different color of paint. 16 Ute Style There are at least twelve panels that show Ute style characteristics. The Ute style rock art is represented by both petroglyphs and pictographs, with the petroglyphs being the subordinate type. These panels are characterized by mounted horsemen, stick figure anthropomorphs, zoomorphs, and shield-bearing anthropomorphs. There are some bichrome Ute style designs, which are outlined in red and partly to fully filled in with orange. Area 1 (Fig. 1) contains two pictograph panels originally assigned to Fremont Style (Wormington 1955:82, Schaafsma 1970:27, Quinn 1980). Both of these panels are partially shown by Wormington (1955:82) and Schaafsma (1970:27-28). The first of these (Fig. 8) is located under a large overhang to the right of a number of later Ute stick figure paintings. The panel contains a large bichrome horned shield-bearing anthropomorph, a large bichrome legless broad shouldered anthropomorph, a large bichrome belt-like design composed of circular elements connected by straight lines, and a large bichrome quadruped. A large monochrome belt-like design very similar to one present here can be found in a Barrier Canyon Style panel in Thompson Canyon. Harrigan (1968:31), shows the bichrome horned shield-bearing anthropomorphic figure found here to be a Ute symbol representative of their war god. The second panel (Fig. 9) is to the right of the first group and out in the open. Portions of it are shown by Wormington (1955:82), Schaafsma (1970:28), and Castleton (1978:175). This panel was also considered to be of Fremont Style (Wormington, 1955, Schaafsma, 1970, Quinn, 1980). The mounted figure in the panel is done with the same bichrome colors as the rest of the panel. Based on this mounted figure, this panel and the one to the right (Fig. 8) are classified as Ute style panels. This panel has some superimposed Ute style spear-carrying mounted horsemen done in white. The third panel (Fig. 10) in area 1 (Fig. 1) depicts a number of stickfigure mounted horsemen carrying feathered coup sticks or lances. Since most hunting parties used the bow and arrow, this panel probably depicts a war party scene. The fourth panel (Fig. 11), this one a very elaborate one, is located under a sandstone overhang in area 3 (Fig. 1). This panel contains designs in red, white, orange, and bichrome. Design elements here include mounted horsemen, hand prints, shields, stick figures, geomorphic designs, and zoomorphic figures. Portions of this panel are shown by Castleton (1978:174-175). Unknown Style There are three pictograph panels in area 1 (Fig. 1) that contain only geometric design elements. These are all faded and none of the design elements are directly comparable to any of the identified panels found elsewhere at this site. Fur Trade Style There are two panels at this site which are done in French, one of which is known to be related to the early fur trade industry. The first of these (Fig. 12) is located in area 2 (Fig. 1) and is commonly called the Robidoux Inscription. It was made by Antoine Robidoux (or one of his party) on November 13, 1837 when he camped here on his way to build his first trading post near 17 Ute Style There are at least twelve panels that show Ute style characteristics. The Ute style rock art is represented by both petroglyphs and pictographs, with the petroglyphs being the subordinate type. These panels are characterized by mounted horsemen, stick figure anthropomorphs, zoomorphs, and shield-bearing anthropomorphs. There are some bichrome Ute style designs, which are outlined in red and partly to fully filled in with orange. Area 1 (Fig. 1) contains two pictograph panels originally assigned to Fremont Style (Wormington 1955:82, Schaafsma 1970:27, Quinn 1980). Both of these panels are partially shown by Wormington (1955:82) and Schaafsma (1970:27-28). The first of these (Fig. 8) is located under a large overhang to the right of a number of later Ute stick figure paintings. The panel contains a large bichrome horned shield-bearing anthropomorph, a large bichrome legless broad shouldered anthropomorph, a large bichrome belt-like design composed of circular elements connected by straight lines, and a large bichrome quadruped. A large monochrome belt-like design very similar to one present here can be found in a Barrier Canyon Style panel in Thompson Canyon. Harrigan (1968:31), shows the bichrome horned shield-bearing anthropomorphic figure found here to be a Ute symbol representative of their war god. The second panel (Fig. 9) is to the right of the first group and out in the open. Portions of it are shown by Wormington (1955:82), Schaafsma (1970:28), and Castleton (1978:175). This panel was also considered to be of Fremont Style (Wormington, 1955, Schaafsma, 1970, Quinn, 1980). The mounted figure in the panel is done with the same bichrome colors as the rest of the panel. Based on this mounted figure, this panel and the one to the right (Fig. 8) are classified as Ute style panels. This panel has some superimposed Ute style spear-carrying mounted horsemen done in white. The third panel (Fig. 10) in area 1 (Fig. 1) depicts a number of stickfigure mounted horsemen carrying feathered coup sticks or lances. Since most hunting parties used the bow and arrow, this panel probably depicts a war party scene. The fourth panel (Fig. 11), this one a very elaborate one, is located under a sandstone overhang in area 3 (Fig. 1). This panel contains designs in red, white, orange, and bichrome. Design elements here include mounted horsemen, hand prints, shields, stick figures, geomorphic designs, and zoomorphic figures. Portions of this panel are shown by Castleton (1978:174-175). Unknown Style There are three pictograph panels in area 1 (Fig. 1) that contain only geometric design elements. These are all faded and none of the design elements are directly comparable to any of the identified panels found elsewhere at this site. Fur Trade Style There are two panels at this site which are done in French, one of which is known to be related to the early fur trade industry. The first of these (Fig. 12) is located in area 2 (Fig. 1) and is commonly called the Robidoux Inscription. It was made by Antoine Robidoux (or one of his party) on November 13, 1837 when he camped here on his way to build his first trading post near 17 the intersection of the Green and Uinta Rivers (Schindler 1979:2-5, Quinn 1982:1-3). This trading post became known as Fort Uinta (Schindler 1979:2-5, Quinn 1982:1-3). The other panel (Fig. 13) is located in area 3 (Fig. 1). This panel is done in a similar manner to that of the Robidoux inscription, but it consists of a Biblical quotation with no date. This panel may be a recent copy of the Robidoux inscription-type French panel across the canyon.  


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